Preschool

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Be a good ancestor

Be a good ancestor

Prince, Leona, author
2022

"Thought-provoking stanzas encourage readers of all ages to consider they ways in which they live in connection to the world around them and encourages them to think deeply about their behaviors. Rooted in Indigenous teachings, the message delivered by the authors is universal, be a good ancestor to the world around you"-- Provided by publisher.

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Circle of love

Circle of love

Gray Smith, Monique, 1968-, author
2024

In this warmhearted book, we join Molly at the Intertribal Community Center, where she introduces us to people she knows and loves: her grandmother and her grandmother's wife, her uncles and their baby, her cousins, and her treasured friends. They dance, sing, garden, learn, pray, and eat together. And tonight, they come together for a feast! Molly shares with the reader how each person makes her feel--and reminds us that love is love.

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Every child matters

Every child matters

Webstad, Phyllis, author
2023

Learn the meaning behind the phrase, 'Every Child Matters.' Orange Shirt Day founder, Phyllis Webstad, offers insights into this heartfelt movement. Every Child Matters honours the history and resiliency of Indigenous Peoples on Turtle Island and moves us all forward on a path toward Truth and Reconciliation. If you're a Residential School Survivor or an Intergenerational Survivor - you matter. For the children who didn't make it home - you matter. The child inside every one of us matters. Every Child Matters.

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Heart berry bling

Heart berry bling

Dupuis, Jenny Kay, author
2023

On a visit to her granny, Maggie is excited to begin her first-ever beading project: a pair of strawberry earrings. However, beading is much harder than she expected! As they work side by side, Granny shares how beading helped her persevere and stay connected to her Anishinaabe culture when she lost her Indian status, forcing her out of her home community-all because she married someone without status, something the men of her community could do freely.

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Little you

Little you

Van Camp, Richard, author
2013


Métis like me

Métis like me

Hilderman, Tasha, author
2024

"A picture book celebrating Métis culture."-- Provided by publisher.

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My powerful hair

My powerful hair

Lindstrom, Carole, 1964-, author
2023

After generations of short hair in her family, a little girl celebrates growing her hair long to connect to her culture and honor the strength and resilience of those who came before her.

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On the trapline

On the trapline

Robertson, David, 1977- author
2021

A boy and Moshom, his grandpa, take a trip together to visit a place of great meaning to Moshom. A trapline is where people hunt and live off the land, and it was where Moshom grew up. As they embark on their northern journey, the child repeatedly asks his grandfather, "Is this your trapline?" Along the way, the boy finds himself imagining what life was like two generations ago -- a life that appears to be both different from and similar to his life now. This is a heartfelt story about memory, imagination and intergenerational connection that perfectly captures the experience of a young child's wonder as he is introduced to places and stories that hold meaning for his family.

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The secret pocket

The secret pocket

Janicki, Peggy, author
2023

The true story of how Indigenous girls at a Canadian residential school sewed secret pockets into their dresses to hide food and survive. Mary was four years old when she was first taken away to the Lejac Indian Residential School. It was far away from her home and family. Always hungry and cold, there was little comfort for young Mary. Speaking Dakelh was forbidden and the nuns and priest were always watching, ready to punish. Mary and the other girls had a genius idea: drawing on the knowledge from their mothers, aunts and grandmothers who were all master sewers, the girls would sew hidden pockets in their clothes to hide food. They secretly gathered materials and sewed at nighttime, then used their pockets to hide apples, carrots and pieces of bread to share with the younger girls. Based on the author's mother's experience at residential school, The Secret Pocket is a story of survival and resilience in the face of genocide and cruelty. But it's also a celebration of quiet resistance to the injustice of residential schools and how the sewing skills passed down through generations of Indigenous women gave these girls a future, stitch by stitch.

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Together we drum, our hearts beat as one

Together we drum, our hearts beat as one

Poll, Willie, author
2022

In this beautifully illustrated book, a young, determined Anishnaabe girl decides to go on a transformative journey into a forest on her traditional territory, in search of adventure. She is joined by a chorus of women and girls in red dresses, who tell her they remember what it was like to be carefree and wild too. Soon, though, the girl is challenged by a monster named Hate who envelops the girl in a cloud of darkness. With the creature at her heels, she climbs a mountain to try and evade him, and with the help of her matriarchs and the power of Thunder Bird, the monster vanishes. With Hate at bay, the women and girls beat their drums together in song and support to give the girl the confidence needed to become a changemaker in the future, capable of fending off any monster in her way.

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Walking together

Walking together

Marshall, Albert (Albert D.), author
2023

"This innovative picture book introduces readers to the concept of Etuaptmumk--or Two-Eyed Seeing in the Mi'kmaq language--as we follow a group of young children connecting to nature as their teacher. A poetic, joyful celebration of the Lands and Waters as spring unfolds: we watch for Robin's return, listen for Frog's croaking, and wonder at Maple Tree's gift of sap. Grounded in Etuaptmumk, also known as Two-Eyed Seeing, the gift of multiple perspectives, and the Mi'kmaw concept of Netukulimk, meaning to protect Mother Earth for the ancestors, present, and future generations, Walking Together nurtures respectful, reciprocal, responsible relationships with the Land and Water, plant-life, animals and other-than-human beings for the benefit of all."-- Provided by publisher.

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Why we dance : a story of hope and healing

Why we dance : a story of hope and healing

Havrelock, Deirdre, author
2024

A young Indigenous girl's family helps calm her nervous butterflies before her first Jingle Dress Dance and reminds her why she dances.

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