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Ancestor approved : intertribal stories for kids

Ancestor approved : intertribal stories for kids

2021

A collection of intersecting stories by both new and veteran Native writers bursts with hope, joy, resilience, the strength of community, and Native pride.

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Beyond the orange shirt story

Beyond the orange shirt story

Webstad, Phyllis, author
2021

Beyond the Orange Shirt Story is a unique collection of truths, as told by Phyllis Webstad's family and others, that will give readers an up-close look at what life was like before, during, and after their Residential School experiences. In this book, Survivors and Intergenerational Survivors share their stories authentically and in their own words. Phyllis has carefully selected stories to help Canadians educate themselves and gain a deeper understanding of the impacts of the Residential School System.

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Borders

Borders

King, Thomas, 1943- author
2021

Borders is a masterfully told story of a boy and his mother whose road trip from Alberta to Salt Lake City is thwarted at the border when they identify their citizenship as Blackfoot. Refusing to identify as either American or Canadian first bars their entry into the US, and then their return into Canada. In the limbo between countries, they find power in their connection to their identity and to each other.

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The case of the pilfered pin

The case of the pilfered pin

Hutchinson, Michael, 1971-, author
2024

The Windy Lake First Nation's lands have been shared with cottagers for 50 years, but no one can agree on where the reserve land ends. When the Mighty Muskrats hear that the only thing that can prove the boundary is a steel surveyor's pin that was stolen years ago -- they make it their mission to find the missing pin and prove that the land belongs to their people.

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Forever Birchwood

Forever Birchwood

Daniel, Danielle, author
2022

Adventurous, trail-blazing Wolf lives in a northern mining town and spends her days exploring the mountains and wilderness with her three best friends Penny, Ann and Brandi. The girls' secret refuge is their tree-house hideaway, Birchwood, Wolf's favourite place on earth. When her beloved grandmother tells her that she is the great-granddaughter of a tree talker, Wolf knows that she is destined to protect the birch trees and wildlife that surround her. But Wolf's mother doesn't understand this connection at all. Not only is she reluctant to engage with their family's Indigenous roots, she seems suspiciously on the wrong side of the environmental protection efforts in their hometown.

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How I survived : four nights on the ice

How I survived : four nights on the ice

Ittusardjuat, Serapio, 1945- author
2020

After his snowmobile breaks down halfway across the sea ice on a trip back from a fishing camp, Serapio Ittusardjuat recounts the traditional skills and knowledge he leaned on to stay alive. This harrowing first-person account of four nights spent on the open sea ice—with few supplies and no water—shows young readers the determination and strength necessary to survive in the harsh Arctic climate, even when the worst occurs.

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Powwow : a celebration through song and dance

Powwow : a celebration through song and dance

Pheasant-Neganigwane, Karen, author
2020

Part of the nonfiction Orca Origins series for middle readers. Illustrated with photographs, Powwow is a guide to the dance, music and culture of this Indigenous celebration.

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Residential schools : the devastating impact on Canada's Indigenous peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's findings and Calls for Action

Residential schools : the devastating impact on Canada's Indigenous peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's findings and Calls for Action

Florence, Melanie, author
2022

Canada's residential school system for Indigenous children is now recognized as a grievous historic wrong committed against First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples. Through historical photographs, documents and first-person narratives from people who survived residential schools, this book offers an account of the injustice of this period in Canadian history. It documents how official racism was confronted and finally acknowledged. In 1857, the Gradual Civilization Act was passed in Canada with the aim of assimilating Indigenous people. In 1879, Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald commissioned a report that led to residential schools across Canada. First Nations and Inuit children were taken from their families and sent to residential schools where they were dressed in uniforms, their hair was cut, they were forbidden to speak their native language and they were often subjected to physical and psychological abuse. The schools were run by churches and funded by the federal government. The last federally funded residential school closed in 1996. The horrors that many children endured at residential schools did not go away. It took decades for people to speak out, but with the support of the Assembly of First Nations and Inuit organizations, former residential school students took the federal government and the churches to court. Their cases led to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the largest class-action settlement in Canadian history. In 2008, Prime Minister Harper formally apologized to former native residential school students for the atrocities they suffered and the role the government played in setting up the school system. The agreement included the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which has worked to document the experience. More than five years after the TRC Report was released, there have been reports of unmarked graves of children being discovered at the site of former residential schools. This updated edition includes some of those findings and examines what has and what still has to be done in regards to the TRC Report's Calls to Action.

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Siksikaitsitapi : stories of the Blackfoot People

Siksikaitsitapi : stories of the Blackfoot People

2022

In 'Siksikaitsitapi', seven Blackfoot authors share their stories that come from both from legend and from their personal experiences, with many of the stories in both Blackfoot and English languages. The book is illustrated with beautiful full-colour pictures and photos which help convey their stories from Blackfoot traditional and contemporary traditions and cultures. The Blackfoot Confederacy is made up of the Siksika, Kainai, Piikani, and Amskapi Piikuni Nations of Southern Alberta and Montana. These stories were originally published as separate books in the Calgary Public Library, Treaty 7 language series.

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Sky Wolf's call : the gift of Indigenous knowledge

Sky Wolf's call : the gift of Indigenous knowledge

Yellowhorn, Eldon, 1956- author
2022

"From healing to astronomy to our connection to the natural world, the lessons from Indigenous knowledge inform our learning and practices today. How do knowledge systems get passed down over generations? Through the knowledge inherited from their Elders and ancestors, Indigenous Peoples throughout North America have observed, practiced, experimented, and interacted with plants, animals, the sky, and the waters over millennia. Knowledge keepers have shared their wisdom with younger people through oral history, stories, ceremonies, and records that took many forms. In Sky Wolf's Call, award-winning author team of Eldon Yellowhorn and Kathy Lowinger reveal how Indigenous knowledge comes from centuries of practices, experiences, and ideas gathered by people who have a long history with the natural world. Indigenous knowledge is explored through the use of fire and water, the acquisition of food, the study of astronomy, and healing practices."-- Provided by publisher.

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Sugar Falls : a residential school story

Sugar Falls : a residential school story

Robertson, David, 1977-, author
2011


Treaty words : for as long as the rivers flow

Treaty words : for as long as the rivers flow

Craft, Aimée, 1980- author
2021

Accompanied by beautiful illustrations by Luke Swinson and an author's note at the end, Aimée Craft affirms the importance of understanding an Indigenous perspective on treaties in this evocative book that is essential for readers of all ages.

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